Arctic-COAST_logo

RCN Arctic-COAST: Arctic COASTal Community and Environmental Resilience International Interdisciplinary Research Coordination Network

Project Description

This project establishes an international Research Coordination Network (RCN) for science-policy interface among researchers, policy and decision makers, and young local and indigenous leaders to better understand and enhance resilience to ongoing dramatic changes in the Arctic. Arctic-COAST will provide an interface between the transdisciplinary research of biophysical, socio-economic, and decision-making academic research domains and policy applications to address the resilience of coastal socio-ecological systems. The Arctic coastal zone, especially in Eurasia, lacks an integrated framework for monitoring socio-ecological systems that could provide key observations for measuring resilience and assessing environmental and community sustainability. Knowledge and policy gaps exist with respect to understanding coastal socio-ecological systems, indicators of sustainability and resilience, scenario-based modeling, and scientific foundations for adaptive governance responses in the Arctic.

By integrating data-rich regional case studies, developing data management tools, and presenting information through an education web-based portal, the network will contribute to research cyberinfrastructure in the circumpolar Arctic. Using a resilience framework as an overarching concept, Arctic-COAST will be instrumental in closing knowledge and policy gaps to foster sustainable development of Arctic ecosystems and communities, which is one of the deliverables for the Sustainable Development Working Group of the Arctic Council during the US Chairmanship 2015-2017.

Arctic-COAST employs a transdisciplinary approach of biophysical, socio-economic and policy research that will interface from the project’s inception. Arctic-COAST knowledge structure encompasses five crosscutting themes related to Arctic coastal social-ecological systems (SES) resilience: indicators and monitoring, community resilience, adaptive governance, future scenario building, and nurturing new Arctic leaders. A sixth information and knowledge management theme is an integrated effort that summarizes, presents and delivers RCN results.

Arctic-COAST will synthesize and disseminate knowledge about the state, dynamics and resilience of coastal SESs focusing on the circumpolar Arctic. To bridge existing knowledge gaps, Arctic-COAST will (1) provide systematic, synthetic knowledge about Eurasian and Northern American Arctic coastal SESs; (2) compile spatial, systems-based understandings of SES resilience for different geographical scales and regional contexts; (3) craft future research directions for Arctic SES resilience and ecosystem stewardship, focusing on governance issues; and (4) foster a new generation of scientists, policy and decision makers capable of adaptive management. Arctic-COAST will fund regular meetings and workshops to promote exchange, collaboration, training and educational opportunities for scientists, early career and Indigenous scholars, students and local community members.

 coast-chart2

******

NSF Arctic-COAST WORKSHOP

SCHEDULE

Arctic-COAST I: Indicators, Resilience, and Governance in Arctic Coastal Social-Ecological Systems

June 23-25, 2016

Murmansk, Russia

Soviet nuclear icebreaker “Lenin

This workshop will gather social and physical scientists, as well as community members, policymakers and business representatives to discuss the issues of measuring impacts of development and environmental change on coastal communities and designing sustainable development indicators to assess the condition of coastal social-ecological systems (CoSES). Furthermore, the workshop will discuss the system of science- and community-based indicators can be used for local and national policymaking and improving business opportunities in Arctic coastal towns.

Key themes/questions:

  1. What are the major changes and drivers within CoSES in the Russian (western) Arctic vis-à-vis other Barents and Polar Regions?
  2. What are the most important elements of SES do we measure/monitor to understand impacts and responses within CoSES and assess their resilience?
  3. What experience is available in the Arctic in respect to standard observations and community-based monitoring?
  4. What are the avenues to connect data and knowledge with governance and business opportunities, in particular in the Russian Arctic coast? (cf. Arctic investment protocol). 

INSTRUCTIONS TO WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS

This workshop will consist of both presentations and discussions. The main goal is to advance our understanding of the Arctic coastal systems via answering workshops four questions. All participant will contribute in two capacities:

  • As presenters and panelists. Keynote speakers will have 30 minutes and panelists 15-20 minutes to present. This typically will involve a formal presentation plus 5-10 minutes of questions. Since some of the participants were unable to obtain visas due to delayed processing, we will have virtual keynotes.
  • As discussants: the main goal of the workshop is to instigate discussion around workshop’s questions and presentations. In addition to speaker/panelist role all participants will also be discussants in other sessions. As discussants you do not need to have a formal presentation, but rather will be asked to give your own perspective on the session’s question and reflect on presented papers (5 min).

 Session Chair/Discussion Lead:

Each session will have a chair and discussion lead. This person will also report the summary of the session at the final wrap up session. Chairs, please review the program and indicate whether you will be able to serve in this role.

****

Recording and workshop materials

Notes will be taken during the workshop to develop a summary at the wrap-up session. Any other recording of presentations and discussions will not be permitted without speaker’s approval. Speakers will be requested to share a version of their presentation to be posted on the Arctic-COAST website, if possible (please direct all questions to Dr. Petrov).

 

WORKSHOP PROGRAM

(workshop is open to the public pending “Lenin” Museum regulations and availability of space)

JUNE 22, 2018

ARRIVALS, Meet and Greet in “Azimut” Hotel Lobby

Day 1: JUNE 23, 2016

VENUE: NUCLEAR ICEBRAKER “LENIN”

8:00 Breakfast in hotel

9:00-9:30 Refreshments (“Lenin”)

9:30 Opening and Welcome

Local Official (welcoming remarks)

Introductions (all participants)

Andrey N Petrov, Aric-COAST Principal Investigator: Arctic-COAST: Inaugurating a Research Coordination Network to Study Arctic Coastal Social-Ecological Systems

Ann Crawford and Emily Francis Technical and Logistics Update

 

10:00-11:30 Discussion Session 1: Understanding Eurasian Coasts I: Changes and Drivers in CoSES (emerging economic, social and urban systems)

Key question

  • What are the major changes and drivers within CoSES in the Russian (western) Arctic vis-à-vis other Barents and Polar Regions?

 

Chair/discussion lead: Scott Stephenson (University of Connecticut, USA)

Keynote: Rasmus Ole Rasmussen (via Skype) (Nordregio, Sweden/Denmark) Megatrends on the Arctic Coasts

Panelists:

Aileen Espiritu (University of Tromso, Norway) “Murmansk: a coastal city?”

Evgeny Denisov (Moscow State University, Russia) “The role of Vorkuta as a base city for the Kara Sea coastal areas development”

Maria Dyakonova (Karelian Research Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences) “Socio-economical development of Arctic coast rural territories on the example of the Republic of Karelia”

Local participants

 

DISCUSSION

 

11:30-12:00 Tour of Icebreaker “Lenin”

 

12:00-13:00 LUNCH

13:0-15:00 Discussion Session 2 Understanding Eurasian Coasts II: Changes and Drivers in CoSES (resources, transportation and infrastructure)

Key question

  • What are the major changes and drivers within CoSES in the Russian Arctic vis-à-vis other Barents and Polar Regions?

 

Chair: Joan Nymand Larsen (Stefansson Arctic Institute, Iceland)

Scott Stephenson (University of Connecticut, USA) “Arctic Ocean Change and Transportation”

Andrey Krivorotov (Stockman Development AG, Russia) “Arctic Offshore Development: Global Economic and Regulatory Challenges”

Gleb Kraev (Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) “Assessment and prediction of geohazards in coastal Arctic communities: the first step towards the adaptation to environmental changes”

Svetlana Isakova (Russian State Hydrometeorological University, Russia) “Development, environmental changes and challenges the Arctic”

Anton Shcherbak (Karelian Research Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences) “AQUAREL – Aquatic Resources for Green Energy Realization”

Svetlana Stepanova (Karelian Research Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences) “Tourist and recreational development in the Russian Arctic Coast”

DISCUSSION

15:00-15:30 Break

15:30-15:45 Open Discussion Forum: Towards Artic coastal research priorities and initiatives

15:30- 16:15 Keynote: Don Forbes (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada) CACCON and Future COAST Research Initiatives (via Skype)

16:15-17:45 Andrey Petrov and Scott Stephenson (leads): Arctic Horizons: Defining priorities for coastal research in the Arctic (Open Forum)

19:00 DINNER

 

Day 2: JUNE 24, 2016

VENUE: NUCLEAR ICEBRAKER “LENIN”

8:00 Breakfast in hotel

9:00-9:15 Refreshments (“Lenin”)

9:15-11:30 Discussion Session 3: Monitoring CoSES I: developing interdisciplinary, integrated indicators and observation frameworks for monitoring sustainability

Key question:

  • What are the most important elements of SES do we measure/monitor to understand impacts and responses within CoSES and assess their resilience?

 

Chair/discussion lead: Andrey Petrov (University of Northern Iowa, USA)

Keynote (9:15-9:45): Laura Eerkes-Medrano (via Skype) (University of Victoria) “User-directed research: Engaging communities and stakeholders in identifying problematic weather events on the west coast of Alaska and Beaufort Sea regions”

Panelists:

Rudolf Rieldsperger (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada) “Towards sustainable housing in Arctic communities in the face of climatic and socioeconomic change – An example from Arviat, Nunavut”

Tatiana Vlasova (Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) “Socially-oriented observations as a transdisciplinary activity for Arctic coastal zone”

Joan Nyman Larsen (Stefansson Arctic Institute, Iceland) “A preliminary framework for  analysing indicators, stressors, risks, and resilient futures: the case of the coastal town of Nanortalik in South Greenland”

Discussants:

Yulia Zaika (Moscow State University, Russia)

Emily Francis (University of Northern Iowa, USA)

 

DISCUSSION

 

11:30-12:00 Biljana Presnall “Arctic-COAST web portal pilot demonstration”

 

12:00-13:00 LUNCH

13:00-14:30 Discussion Session 4: Monitoring CoSES II: Community based monitoring on the Arctic coasts

Key question:

  • What experience is available in the Arctic in respect to standard observations and community-based monitoring?

Chair/discussion lead: Tatiana Vlasova (Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia)

Keynote (13:00-13:30): Trevor Bell (via Skype) (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada)

Panelists:

Yulia Zaika (Moscow State University, Russia) “Community experiences and predictions from interviews during the socially-oriented observations in Murmansk region”

Varvara Korkina (University of Northern Iowa, USA) “Indigenous community perceptions of climate change and challenges to adaptation in the Russian Arctic”

Discussants:

Don Forbes (via Skype) (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada)

Andrey Petrov (University of Northern Iowa, USA)

Boris Sulyandziga (Russian Academy of Public Administration, Russia)

Rudolf Rieldsperger (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada)

Svetlana Isakova (Russian State Hydrometeorological University, Russia)

 

DISCUSSION

14:30-14:50 Break

14:50-16:00 Discussion session 5: Connecting CoSES knowledge with governance

Key question:

  • What are the avenues to connect data and knowledge with governance and business opportunities, in particular in the Russian Arctic coast? (cf. Arctic investment protocol).

 

Chair/discussion lead: Rudolf Rieldsperger (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada)

Discussants/Panelists

Rune Rafaelsen (Mayor, City of Kirkenes) [TBC]

Biljana Presnall (Jefferson Institute, USA)

Andrey Krivorotov (Stockman Development AG, Russia)

Andrey Petrov (University of Northern Iowa, USA)

Boris Sulyandziga (Russian Academy of Public Administration, Russia)

Varvara Korkina (University of Northern Iowa, USA)

 

16:15-17:30 Plenary: Summary and Wrap-Up

Chair: Andrey N Petrov

Reporting from discussion groups

Scott Stephenson

Andrey N Petrov

Tatiana Vlasova

Joan Nymand Larsen

Rudolf Rieldsperger

 

17:30-18:00 Arctic-COAST: future directions

 

19:00 DINNER

 

Day 3: JUNE 25, 2016

Arctic-COASTal community experience: Trip to TERIBERKA

9:00-19:00